Monday, 16 February 2009

Repairing Lawns.

MY PENNINE WAY PICTURE FOR TODAY
Which Way?

East Gill Force, Keld.



TODAYS WEATHER READINGS
Temp Low: 4C
Temp High: 11C
Feels Like: -1 to 7C
Precipitation: 0 mm
Wind Speed: 32 mph
Wind Direction: NW
UV Index: Low
Weather: Dry and bright.

MY WORK BOOK

Seeing to the sheep
Field
Misc
Mon 16/02/2009 08:30
Mon 16/02/2009 08:50
20 minutes
1) Took across some hay
2) Put out some minerals.
3) Checked and counted the sheep.

Moving plants.
Greenhouse & Conservatory
Indoors
Mon 16/02/2009 08:50
Mon 16/02/2009 10:00
70 minutes
Fill log box
Hall
Misc
Mon 16/02/2009 10:00
Mon 16/02/2009 10:40
40 minutes
Took in 8 baskets of logs.

Break for tea
Home
Misc
Mon 16/02/2009 10:40
Mon 16/02/2009 11:00
20 minutes
Empty and reset the mole trap
Tower cottage
Public Gardens
Mon 16/02/2009 11:00
Mon 16/02/2009 11:15
15 minutes

Harrow the gravel
North Front
Public Gardens
Mon 16/02/2009 11:15
Mon 16/02/2009 11:55
40 minutes

Remove the mole hills
Tower cottage
Public Gardens
Mon 16/02/2009 11:55
Mon 16/02/2009 12:15
20 minutes

Put the grass right outside our window
Garage Lawn
Public Gardens
Mon 16/02/2009 12:15
Mon 16/02/2009 12:45
30 minutes

Break for lunch
Home
Misc
Mon 16/02/2009 12:45
Mon 16/02/2009 13:30
45 minutes

Put the grass right
Office Lawn
Public Gardens
Mon 16/02/2009 13:30
Mon 16/02/2009 14:30
1 hour

Prune the roses on the east wall
Long Dahlia Border
Walled Garden
Mon 16/02/2009 14:30
Mon 16/02/2009 15:00
30 minutes

Digging
Long Dahlia Border
Walled Garden
Mon 16/02/2009 15:00
Mon 16/02/2009 16:45
1.75 hours

Clean and put away the tools
Potting Shed
Indoors
Mon 16/02/2009 16:45
Mon 16/02/2009 17:00
15 minutes

COMMENTS FROM THE POTTING SHED
Annie Wicking I’m afraid that the other day I was joking with you all, the picture was an old one I had saved and it was just meant to be a fun thing with the shark.
Matron Someone sent me the pic years ago and when I saw your garden I couldn’t resist using it.
EB I can’t really say about the flood in the picture because as I say it was just a fun thing I had and not really from around here.
The Weaver of Grass I don’t know if there are minerals in the snow or not, I suppose there will be stuff in it that it collected on its way to earth.
Jeanette There are no doubt some that would welcome the flood and the shark, at least they would probably still have a home even if it were a bit wet.

6 comments:

Sara said...

OK, did you actually catch a mole in your mole trap?

I have a mole every year, who is the bane of my existence and I have tried lots of methods to get rid of him. None have worked.

Read my mole patrol post to see what I have tried:
http://saralovesdogs.blogspot.com/2007/07/mole-patrol.html

If you did catch the mole, which I find hard to believe, considering my vast experience (albeit completely unsuccessful) in mole hunting, what did you use as bait and what type of trap is it?

Annie Wicking said...

I guess I knew that about your shark. They don't like fresh water and as for eating cars a big no, no for them. Boats are a favourite with the great white according to the film Jaws ....lol

Great photographs, I could do with being lost on the moors with my camera.

The Weaver of Grass said...

How do you do with catching moles, Bob? We have permanent traps down and the farmer goes round them every day - probably catches on average one a week. I see you are already pruning your roses - we dare not do that for another month, although my Alexander Girault climber on the calf house is in full leaf in spite of the cold.

EB said...

The absence of moles is one of the consolations for living in a town, with a town garden. I remember my grandfather almost in tears as he counted more than 80 molehills in our front garden when I was growing up (they would have been in the back too but there were hens and pigs there). He tried using traps but he was too soft-hearted to try hard enough!

Ian said...

What I do is dig the hole with a spike, put my smelly old hand down it, then let the dog have a good sniff around and that seems to drive them away. They don't like the smell.

Anyway, I come to you because you were recommended to me by Goings on at Mad Bush Farm in New Zealand and you can see a post about you at http://farmblogs.blogspot.com/2009/02/goings-on-at-mad-bush-farm_17.html


Farm Blogs From Around the World is a place to to gather in one place the best farm blogs from around the world. Recommended farm blogs are asked to send a brief email (to info AT ianwalthew.com) about their farm/smallholding and their blog, and to include their own recommended farm blogs. I then make a posting. If it gets any more complicated that that, then....well, the idea is that it doesn't get much more complicated than that.

I would very much appreciate it if you could please consider:

a) sending me some text about your blog and activities (including acreage and crops/livestock/fibres etc. to help like minded souls find you.

b) writing to me with your (up to) Top 5 farm recommendations - not currently listed on my blog; particularly from countries not yet represented or under represented. I am particularly interested in blogs from the UK, New Zealand, South America, Asia and Africa at the moment. The proper name of the blog, the exact url, the location and one sentence on why you like it is perfect, but if pressed for time, just the links. U.S blogs are fine, but we have a lot and I am trying really hard to find good bloggers in different parts of the world, but if your list is all-American, no drama.

c) send me permission to use up to 5 photos from your site for a one off usage so that with your text I can make a posting about you;

d) add a link on your website, if that's possible, to www.farmblogs.blogspot.com; and if you can find a moment even make a posting about www.farmblogs.blogspot.com and how this blog is growing organically across the world from other farming bloggers. (Because you have been recommended in this way you are already on the blog roll for the U.K.)

I know this is a drag but a lot of people are finding that my blog is driving traffic to them and are finding it a great source of quality blogs about farming/gardening/smallholding so I hope you can find a moment to drop me a line.

I very much hope to hear from you, and thanks for taking the time to read and respond to this. When you do I'll get you up and running as soon as possible.

With kind regards,

Ian

www.farmblogs.blogspot.com
www.ianwalthew.com

The Weaver of Grass said...

Bob. Your photographs today are near to where we live - we walk often at Keld - lovely area.
Thought you would be interested - in The times today it says that many stately homes with famous gardens are expecting huge losses of tender plants with this bad winter - it cites Devon and Cornwall as being worst hit. If I remember last time it was a bad winter Geoff Hamilton (that tells you how long ago it was) said leave everything at least for the summer as often plants which look dead eventually revive. I don.t suppose people with gardens open to the public can afford to do that.